What you need to know about wearing a face mask in New Zealand


From 11.59 pm on Sunday 30 August 2020 all people in New Zealand must, unless they have an exemption, wear a mask or face covering on buses, trains, ferries, and on all flights at Alert Level 2 and above. Children on School Buses do not need to wear a face mask.

A mask or face covering needs to cover both your nose and mouth. It is important not to touch your mask or face covering and then your face with your hands while you are wearing it. 

The government have released this on their website about when you need to wear a mask of mask and face-covering at each Alert Level in the community


Visit here to read all of the Government rules and recommendations

https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-health-advice-general-public/covid-19-use-masks-and-face-coverings-community


All Alert Levels 

If people are unwell in the community with COVID-19 symptoms, they should stay at home and seek medical advice.

If you need to travel to see a health professional, a mask or face covering should be worn – for example, people with symptoms of COVID-19 who are asked to have a test should wear a mask or face covering during their travel to the appropriate testing facility.


Alert Level 4

Not many people will need to wear masks or face coverings because only those delivering or accessing essential services will be allowed freedom of movement.

Practice these basic hygiene measures

  • Keep your distance (2 metres in public) from other people.

  • Clean your hands often.

  • Sneeze and cough into your elbow.

  • Keep a track of where you’ve been and who you’ve seen (use the NZ COVID Tracer App).

It is highly recommended that you wear a mask or face covering in closed spaces where physical distancing is not always possible and contact with other people outside your bubble may occur, except:

  • From 11.59 pm on Sunday 30 August 2020 you will be required to wear a mask on buses, trains, ferries and on all flights (except where exemptions apply). Face coverings such as a bandana or a scarf can also be used if you don’t have a mask.  

Alert Level 3

You should continue to stay in your household bubbles whenever you are not at work or school. You should stay within your household bubble but can expand this to connect with close family/whānau, or bring in caregivers, or to support isolated people.

Practice the basic hygiene measures as for Alert Level 4.

It is highly recommended that you wear a mask or face covering in closed spaces where physical distancing is not always possible and contact with other people outside your bubble may occur, except:

  • From 11.59 pm on Sunday 30 August 2020 you will be required to wear a mask on buses, trains, ferries and on all flights (except where exemptions apply). Face coverings such as a bandana or a scarf can also be used if you don’t have a mask. 

Alert Level 2

You can still go to work and school, but you should practise the basic hygiene measures as for Alert Levels 3 and 4.

You may choose to wear a mask or face covering in situations where physical distancing outside your bubble is not possible except: 

  • From 11.59 pm on Sunday 30 August 2020 you will be required to wear a mask on buses, trains, ferries and on all flights (except where exemptions apply). Face coverings such as a bandana or a scarf can also be used if you don’t have a mask. 

Alert Level 1

It is not necessary for the general public to wear masks or face coverings because there is no evidence of COVID-19 community transmission.


Exemptions on public transport — at Alert Level 2 and above

Exemptions from wearing masks or face coverings on public transport at Alert Level 2 and above are:

  • children under 12 years of age

  • a person who has a medical condition that prevents them from wearing a mask or face covering safely or comfortably — this includes people with asthma or a disability. 


Use of face masks in schools and tertiary institutions


Children and young people at early learning services and schools


Alert Level 2

Children and young people do not need to wear masks or face coverings at Alert Level 2 because the risk of infection within early learning services and school environments is low.

Other public health control measures will be in place, including children and staff staying home if they are sick, contact tracing, and hygiene requirements.


Alert Level 3

Children and young people do not need to wear masks or face coverings at Alert Level 3 if they remain within their early learning or school bubbles of up to 20 children. This includes staying at least 2 metres away from children from other early learning or school bubbles outside.

Other public health control measures will be in place including children and staff staying home if they are sick, contact tracing, and hygiene requirements.


Children and young people on transport provided by early learning services and schools


Alert Level 2

Children and young people are not required to wear masks or face coverings on school transport at Alert Level 2. This includes buses or vans chartered or used by schools or early learning services to carry children, students and staff.

Children and young people aged 6 years and over can choose to wear a mask or face covering when they are on school transport.


Alert Level 3

School transport is unlikely to run at Alert Level 3. 

If it is operating, children and young people are not required to wear masks or face coverings on school transport. This includes buses or vans chartered or used by schools or early learning services to carry children, students and staff.

Children and young people aged 6 years and over can choose to wear a mask or face covering when they are on school transport.


How do I get an affordable mask?

So with all these new rules, face masks are getting harder to come by, and not all of us can afford them.

So whether you have a sewing machine or have never sewn before, or maybe you would prefer a disposable mask. Check out our affordable patterns and instructions below.


How to Sew a simple fabric face mask

It is popular in Japan to wear a courtesy mask. The point of the courtesy mask is the protection of others, not of oneself. If you feel a bit under the weather but could not take the day off, it is a common courtesy to cover your mouth and nose with a mask, so as not to spread your germs all over the place, or on your fellow commuters.

This would be a good option at all levels, especially in the cold and flu season.


Visit here for materials and instructions

https://blog.japanesecreations.com/how-to-sew-a-simple-fabric-face-mask



No-Sew Pleated Face Mask with Handkerchief and Hair Tie

This is a great option if you have no sewing skills. This is a simple and easy project and you could pick up your materials from the $2 shop or supermarket. Even better, browse some of our great local OP Shops.


Visit here for materials and instructions

https://blog.japanesecreations.com/no-sew-face-mask-with-handkerchief-and-hair-tie


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